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 Having had a personal opportunity to speak with Ms. Liles after all this time, she shared `Florida's Child' - Bradley McGee's life story with C. Bailey-Lloyd. In her heartfelt words, she explained how she still advocates child abuse prevention and still follows the case of Sheryl Coe, Bradley's biological mother. Today, we revisit Bradley's brief time on earth.

This is an ever-changing world and there are many things in it that we would like to protect our children from. The last thing any parent wants to see is their child violated, hurt or in pain.

As parents, we do our best to provide our children with safety equipment, expose them to lessons that will give them the tools to protect themselves and be there for them when they need us. Unfortunately, we cannot be with our children 24-7, especially as they grow and venture into the world towards independence.

I looked at my father for the last time before he was finally laid to rest. And I said to myself, "I forgive you father".

Child abuse is a matter that plagued our society for many decades and it a facet that needs to addressed and addressed in a very serious manner.

The sexual abuse is a common concern in today's world. Every child is some way or the other a victim of child abuse.

Childhood Responses to Threat

When humans are young, their world often revolves around their parents. Parents are the source of safety and security, of love and understanding, of nurturance and support. A child experiencing abuse develops strategies, which become coping mechanisms which enable day-to-day functioning, but yet help the child detach from the emotional and physical pain of events, especially when abuse continues over a long period of time (Henderson, 2006).

The prevalence of child sexual abuse is difficult to determine because it is often not reported; experts agree that the incidence is far greater than what is reported to authorities. CSA is also not uniformly defined, so statistics may vary. Statistics below represent some of the research done on child sexual abuse.

The following discusses signs of possible physical abuse. While much of this information can be valuable to all first responders, some of it may be beyond the experience of first responders who do not have an extensive medical background.

The definition of Child Abuse varies from state to state. Many states use Federal Law as a guideline when it comes to definitions.

The Federal Child Abuse Prevention and Treatment Act (CAPTA), (42 U.S.C.A. 5106g), as amended by the Keeping Children and Families Safe Act of 2003, defines child abuse and neglect as,

The physical abuse of children includes any nonaccidental physical injury caused by the child's caretaker. Physical abuse can vary greatly in frequency and severity. It may include injuries sustained from burning, beating, kicking, or punching. Although the injury is not an accident, neither is it necessarily the intent of the child's caretaker to injure the child. Physical abuse may result from the punishment that is inappropriate to the child's age, developmental level, or condition.

There are four commonly recognized forms of child maltreatment: physical abuse, neglect, psychological abuse, and sexual abuse. The definitions of these types of child maltreatment may vary depending on the State or the locality in which the first responder works. First responders should become familiar with the definitions that apply in their jurisdictions. Additionally, the signs of child maltreatment listed here do not indicate absolutely that child maltreatment has occurred.

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