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Healing (109)

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Our Stories (13)

One of the things that can be helpful in the healing process is knowing you are not alone. I've found it helpful that, while my story is unique to me, I do have something in common with other survivors. We have invited survivors to share their stories...from abuse to surviving and thriving. We also invite you to share your story, no matter where you are in your journey. Your story can and will inspire others. In this section, you'll find such stories. 

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I was 16 years old the last time I went into foster care, and I was again assigned to a new caseworker. I remember liking her immediately because she spoke to me like an adult.

It is refreshing when I hear and read survivor stories...The "survivor" attitude is something I can relate to...and it's great to see people go from "victim" to "survivor". During my journey as a survivor, I've met some great people along the way. One of those is Aprel Phelps Downey. On this page is more information on Aprel's book, "Mending The Broken Parts". It's not always easy to make the journey to survivor.

After months of couch surfing, I was 14 and in foster care. My journey began in Fairbanks, AK, at an emergency shelter. Eventually, I was told that I was going to be placed in Tribal foster care because I am a registered Alaska Native. At first I thought, "What's the difference? Still a system right? One can't be worse than the other." But even though my family is Alaska Native, I grew up in the city. No one in the family is traditional in any way, except for the food our distant family members sent us on occasion. What did I know about Tribal anything? I didn't even have Alaska Native friends. Thoughts of native foster parents living in the village crossed my mind, and I was scared.

Addiction or getting really used to anything is bad, especially drug addiction is considered very harmful and it destroys the person completely. It may even lead to loss of one’s life. Addiction especially drug addiction is a hazard, but in the modernized world one may find a number of solutions to such a difficult problem.

When should you start being concerned about you or your loved ones drinking and alcohol abuse? This article uncovers some of the signs, consequences and steps to take when alcohol and abuse become a concern.

Did you know that around the world alcohol and abuse is related to over 2 million deaths a year? With over 11,000 recovery centers in the U.S. alone alcohol and abuse is not going away. In this article we explore some of the common myths around this ever so important topic.

You CAN fully heal from childhood abuse. Discover the powerful Inner Bonding process that enables you to remember and heal from traumatic abuse.

In the 37 years that I have been counseling individuals, I have worked with many people who have suffered from severe physical, emotional, and/or sexual abuse in childhood. Many who have sought my help were suffering from fear and anxiety, depression, various addictions, relationship problems and sexual problems. Many of these people had no memory of their childhood and had no idea why there were so unhappy. Many had spent years in therapy yet had never remembered their abuse.

During the many years I've been counseling people, I’ve worked with many people who were sexually abused as children. Some of them remember it all their lives, while others repressed it and remember it only as adults. In either case, the resulting harm exists on many levels.

Our earliest relationships create blueprints for all of our future relationships. These early experiences create the lens through which we view others. Every interaction that we have with another individual is influenced by our own personal past experiences.

There is much literature on how to parent challenging children these days. Unfortunately, much of that literature does not typically address the child with special parenting needs and a special parenting understanding. A child that has been diagnosed with reactive attachment disorder, oppositional defiant disorder, or even depression, requires anunderstanding not of the behavior itself, but rather of the underlying dynamics driving the behavior.

Living fearless was something I always dreamed of. While that might not be entirely possible I have learned how to live fear less. And that has been something great.

I have, for most of my life, wanted to be fearless. Since I was very young I felt like I experienced more than my share of fear. What caused this I cannot say. Whether it was an anomaly from birth, a neurological misfiring, a spiritual malady or a mix of all of these I won'€™t ever know. This is what I do know, I have always been aware of it, and I have always wanted it gone. Disappear fear! Growing up I felt isolated, especially from other men, all of the time assuming they did not share my experiences. I was wrong. Now I have an idea why.

Author Dan Griffin explores the connections between trauma, violence and addiction and asks what a trauma-informed curriculum can offer men in recovery.

Most of the men I’ve talked to over the years in the journey through recovery can identify some point in their lives when they realized it was not okay to express certain feelings or behaviors, especially if those feelings showed weakness, vulnerability or sensitivity. Crying above all was strictly discouraged.

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