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Physical abuse is non-accidental physical injury (ranging from minor bruises to severe fractures or death) as a result of punching, beating, kicking, biting, shaking, throwing, stabbing, choking, hitting (with a hand, stick, strap, or other object), burning, or otherwise harming a child, that is inflicted by a parent, caregiver, or other person who has responsibility for the child. Such injury is considered abuse regardless of whether the caregiver intended to hurt the child. Physical discipline, such as spanking or paddling, is not considered abuse as long as it is reasonable and causes no bodily injury to the child.

The first step in helping abused or neglected children is learning to recognize the signs of child abuse and neglect. The presence of a single sign does not mean that child maltreatment is occurring in a family, but a closer look at the situation may be warranted when these signs appear repeatedly or in combination. 

 

 

When children are removed from their home or other unsafe environment and placed into Foster Care, they lose everything that is familiar to them. They  MIRAHS CLOSET BRPoften come into care without any personal items. In 2015, The Blue Ribbon Project launched its Backpacks of Love Program to provide emergency essentials to children the moment they enter the foster care system. Our Backpacks of Love contain essential necessities for kids of all ages who are entering the system. Each backpack is designed to be gender and age specific. These backpacks include such things as a toothbrush, toothpaste, hairbrush, children's soap/body wash, children's shampoo, changes of clothing for the child's age, personal clothing (underwear, socks, pajamas), and age appropriate books and toys.

For Immediate Release
2018-029
Tuesday, January 30, 2018 - 9:00am

“Backpacks of Love” to Assist Victims of Child Abuse and Neglect

During the month of February, Charles County Government, in partnership with the La Plata Police Department, is supporting The Blue Ribbon Project’s Backpacks of Love program with several Charles County drop-off locations. The Backpacks of Love program supports victims of child abuse and neglect by providing children with a backpack of essential necessities to assist them the first 24 to 48 hours when they enter foster care at a moment’s notice. 

Backpacks are filled with age and gender specific items. If you are interested in building a backpack to donate or donating individual items, visit www.blueribbonproject.org/how-to-help/build-a-backpack-of-love.html for a full list of items. 

County drop-off locations:
Charles County Government (200 Baltimore Street, La Plata)
Mattawoman Utilities Office (5310 Hawthorne Road, La Plata) 
Department of Public Works/ Department of Emergency Services (10430 Audie Lane, La Plata)
Department of Community Services (8190 Port Tobacco Road, Port Tobacco)
La Plata Police Department (101 La Grange Avenue, La Plata)

Those who would like to support the Backpacks of Love program with monetary donations, visit www.blueribbonproject.org/how-to-help/donate.html to learn more. If you would like to donate items from the comfort of your home, visit www.amazon.com/gp/registry/wishlist/2QNS0JI0VESCX. For more information about The Blue Ribbon Project, visit www.blueribbonproject.org

main image towne salute1An officer’s badge tends to be their most recognizable mark. But, how often do we see what’s beyond the badge?

Meet Taylor Pyles, Annapolis Police Department Detective with the Criminal Investigations Division and founder of the non-profit community organization, The Blue-Ribbon Project.

After a decade working as a disc jockey for WNAV 1430 AM in Annapolis, Pyles wanted to take part in something more rewarding, so he traded in his microphone for a badge at the Annapolis Police Department. After working five years in the Patrol Division, Pyles moved to the Criminal Investigations Division where he primarily investigates violent crimes and crimes against children.

As a former foster child himself, Pyles wanted a way to help others in the foster care system. In 2013, he developed a website as a resource for adult survivors of abuse complete with articles on mental health, drug addiction, and more.

Read The Full Article in What's Up? Magazine

Juvenile Sex Offenders

A sad fact is that sometimes children and teens are sex offenders. Some of these children may live in a home that is investigated for neglect and abuse, while others may be in foster case. It’s vital that the safety and wellbeing of children in these homes is looked after.

When a child is in a dangerous home environment, every effort should be made to get him or her to safety. However, healing doesn’t stop with providing a child with a safer home. Children who suffer abuse often continue to suffer in other ways long after they are separated from their abuser, showing symptoms years or even decades into adulthood. These symptoms can be devastating for them and their personal relationships.

Teenage suicide is a tragic event that is unfortunately more common than many people may realize. Though there is no one who is completely safe from this tragedy, some teens may be more at risk than others. People should always act if they believe that a friend or family member is exhibiting behavior typical of someone considering suicide. Dismissing the worry may lead to tragedy.

     For both children and parents, adoption is a life-changing event. Some couples choose to adopt because they are unable to have biological children; others pursue the option because they want to expand their family and offer a child a home. For children growing up in the often erratic world of foster care or in an orphanage, becoming part of a permanent family is a radically new experience that leads to a more stable life.

Abuse takes many forms against children, including emotional, sexual and physical. It can take place in school, at home, or in the community. There are a wide range of perpetrators, including parents, neighbors, teachers, children, and strangers.

Children who have dealt with maltreatment and abuse who serious changes in vital areas of the brain. These changes have been linked with schizophrenia, PTSD, depression, and drug addiction. Abuse during childhood massively increases the risk of victims turning to drugs and alcohol. They may have experienced verbal or emotional abuse, separation or discord with their parents, emotional or physical neglect, or abuse of a physical or sexual nature. Brain scans offer evidence of trauma, even if they had not been diagnosed with a particular disorder.

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